dxmedstudent

dxmedstudent:

The Student Room have an excellent table of the current (as of August 2013*).  As per usual always check with the universities you are interested in. Always. You only get to apply to 4 medical schools in a UCAS cycle.  Don’t be the person who wasted a precious place on their application because they didn’t bother to check whether that university accepts students with their choice of A levels.

Super useful for all you UK hopefuls…

dxmedstudent

Anonymous asked:

Hey do you know any medicine tumblers who are English? How different is the American medicine procedure of like the process of getting in

ladykaymd answered:

wayfaringmd still has the most comprehensive list of medblrs! Some of the people on there are UK docs/med students. :) 

I know next to nothing about the process of admission in the UK so I would pleasantly ask any of my followers who are premed/med in the UK to reblog this with the answer of what the UK admissions are like! :) 

Thanks lovely friends across the pond! :)

dxmedstudent:

Hi, anon! I wrote a post about this only recently, listing all the UK medblrs I currently know, with the aim of finding new UK Medblrs.Some of them aren’t on Wayfaring’s list yet.  Feel free to check them out, many of them are willing to answer questions from prospective students. 

I have also written several posts about the UK medical school admission process from my experiece, because it’s quite different to the US one. The entrance exams used, and the application processes themselves have similarities, but you will probably find it much more useful to google UK-specific resources. There are a lot of resources out there, luckily. Bear in mind that what each university expects can be slightly different (for example, the weighting they give entrance exams versus personal statements, or the A level subjects they want you to have taken), so if in doubt, talk to the universities you are considering applying to.

I link to some pretty interesting articles and resources about admissions, and I’m sure you will be able to find many more.  If you’re in the dark it might provide a starting point for your journey. Good luck!

Anonymous asked:

What's your view on smoking whilst breastfeeding and drinking about three hours before a feed ?

Never really looked at alcohol and breast feeding so good question. The website below offers some reliable advice, they recommend if you are to drink whilst breast feeding, have a drink with a meal AFTER you feed, then the alcohol has time to be processed before the next feed. But remember drink in moderation, try and have alcohol free days at least twice a week.

https://www.drinkaware.co.uk/check-the-facts/health-effects-of-alcohol/fertility-and-pregnancy/alcohol-and-breastfeeding

As for smoking…to put it bluntly my view is don’t smoke. Your child will want a healthy parent as they grow up who is going to be around for as long as possible. Smoking is a sure fire way to end up dying prematurely, not something you want to put your child through. And smoking in the house or around the baby is detrimental to your child’s health. Try and cut down first, then attempt to quit with some support…speak to your doctor/nurse.

Anonymous asked:

Okay this is going to sound like the weirdest question in the universe but someone asked me it today and I was stumped. If you left urine out in like a glass. Would it give of fumes like dangerous ones ? Or is it like not harmful when it comes out if your body

Yup…probably the weirdest question in the universe! I don’t think it will give off toxic fumes or is super harmful. At the end of the day Bear Grylls drinks it! (Don’t drink pee kids)

stethoscopelife

biomedicalephemera:

Our Three (Brain) Mothers

Protecting our brain and central nervous system are the meninges, derived from the Greek term for “membrane”. You may have heard of meningitis - this is when the innermost layer of the meninges swells, often due to infection, and can cause nerve or brain damage, and sometimes death.

There are three meningeal layers: the dura mater, arachnoid mater, and pia mater. In Latin, “mater” means “mother”. The term comes from the enveloping nature of these membranes, but we later learned how apt it was, because of how protective and essential the meningeal layers are.

——————————————————-

  • The dura mater is the outermost and toughest membrane. Its name means “tough mother”.

The dura is most important for keeping cerebrospinal fluid where it belongs, and for allowing the safe transport of blood to and from the brain. This layer is also water-tight - if it weren’t, our cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) would leak out, and our central nervous system would have no cushion! Its leathery qualities mean that even when the skull is broken, more often than not, the dura (and the brain it encases) is not punctured.

  • The arachnoid mater is the middle membrane. Its name means "spider-like mother", because of its web-like nature.

The arachnoid is attached directly to the deep side of the dura, and has small protrusions into the sinuses within the dura, which allows for CSF to return to the bloodstream and not become stagnant. It also has very fine, web-like projections downward, which attach to the pia mater. However, it doesn’t contact the pia mater in the same way as the dura: the CSF flows between the two meningeal layers, in the subarachnoid space. The major superficial blood vessels are on top of the arachnoid, and below the dura.

  • Pia mater is the innermost membrane, which follows the folds (sulci) of the brain and spinal cord most closely. Its name means “tender mother”.

The pia is what makes sure the CSF stays between the meninges, and doesn’t just get absorbed into the brain or spinal cord. It also allows for new CSF from the ventricles to be shunted into the subarachnoid space, and provides pathways for blood vessels to nourish the brain. While the pia mater is very thin, it is water-tight, just like the dura mater. The pia is also the primary blood-brain barrier, making sure that no plasma proteins or organic molecules penetrate into the CSF. 

Because of this barrier, medications which need to reach the brain or meninges must be administered directly into the CSF.

Images:
Anatomy: Practical and Surgical. Henry Gray, 1909.

braveresponders
sh-tmypartnersays:

thealmost-do-ctor:

fuckyeahnarcotics:

A 25yo woman presented to emergency room after accidentally swallowing a spoon, she had no abdominal pain, fever, vomiting, dysphagia, voice change, cough, or difficulty breathing; the patient was previously healthy and her past medical history was insignificant, general and abdominal examination was unremarkable, there was no abnormal finding in the laboratory tests; an urgent plain abdominal radiograph revealed a metallic foreign body in the lower mid-abdomen, inspection and removal was attempted by flexible gastroscopy, however, several attempts to remove the spoon failed because the patient could not tolerate the resultant nausea when the spoon was pulled to the cardia; she had to be taken to the operating room for an exploratory laparotomy, laparotomy demonstrated no free pus and fluid within the peritoneal cavity, after surgery, the patient was well and was discharged home on postoperative day

I just hate it when I swallow spoons too…

Sorry I’m not sorry… THE FUCK YOU DOING SWALLOWING SPOONS

sh-tmypartnersays:

thealmost-do-ctor:

fuckyeahnarcotics:

A 25yo woman presented to emergency room after accidentally swallowing a spoon, she had no abdominal pain, fever, vomiting, dysphagia, voice change, cough, or difficulty breathing; the patient was previously healthy and her past medical history was insignificant, general and abdominal examination was unremarkable, there was no abnormal finding in the laboratory tests; an urgent plain abdominal radiograph revealed a metallic foreign body in the lower mid-abdomen, inspection and removal was attempted by flexible gastroscopy, however, several attempts to remove the spoon failed because the patient could not tolerate the resultant nausea when the spoon was pulled to the cardia; she had to be taken to the operating room for an exploratory laparotomy, laparotomy demonstrated no free pus and fluid within the peritoneal cavity, after surgery, the patient was well and was discharged home on postoperative day

I just hate it when I swallow spoons too…

Sorry I’m not sorry… THE FUCK YOU DOING SWALLOWING SPOONS
dxmedstudent

dxmedstudent:

You’re probably aware that most of the excellent medblrs on Tumblr are by US medical students. I recently recieved a question asking for UK medblrs, which is fair enough given that prospective or current UK medical students sometimes need advice from others who have been in the same situation. And…

Very senior….makes me feel old ;)