doctorphantom

doctorphantom:

Soooo black Wednesday has been and gone. For the unintiated this is the day when all the fresh doctors from medical school arrive to take up their first jobs.

image

(no, we’ll be fine! I promise!)

I am a year senior so we get inducted and start around 2 days later than the newbie doctors. When I…

Good advice, very relevant as I’ve just started!! No tears for me yet, but the 39 hour weekend was hard…

wonderland-would-be-nice
wonderland-would-be-nice:

cluelessmedic:

Goodpasture’s Syndrome
autoimmune condition characterised by anti-GBM (glomerular basement membrane) antibodies
antibodies are directed against type IV collagen
classically produces a pulmonary-renal syndrome
Features; haemoptysis, dyspnoea, pulmonary haemorrhage, rapidly progressing glomerulonephritis (haematuria, red cell casts, proteinuria, loss of kidney function)
Diagnosis - anti-GBM antibodies, renal biopsy


Please raise awareness for this, there is so little known about goodpasture syndrome even though it is such a severe thing to get. It is very rare but has an extremely high mortality rate.

wonderland-would-be-nice:

cluelessmedic:

Goodpasture’s Syndrome

  • autoimmune condition characterised by anti-GBM (glomerular basement membrane) antibodies
  • antibodies are directed against type IV collagen
  • classically produces a pulmonary-renal syndrome
  • Features; haemoptysis, dyspnoea, pulmonary haemorrhage, rapidly progressing glomerulonephritis (haematuria, red cell casts, proteinuria, loss of kidney function)
  • Diagnosis - anti-GBM antibodies, renal biopsy

Please raise awareness for this, there is so little known about goodpasture syndrome even though it is such a severe thing to get. It is very rare but has an extremely high mortality rate.

thisfuturemd
nprglobalhealth:

As Ebola Surges, CDC Sends Aid And Warns Against Travel
For the second time this week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has raised the travel alert for three West African countries, as the death toll in the Ebola outbreak increased at an alarming rate.
"The bottom line is that the multiple outbreaks in West Africa are worsening right now," the CDC’s director Dr. Tom Frieden told NPR Thursday. “This is the biggest, most complex and the most difficult outbreak of Ebola that we’ve had to deal with.”
In only four days, the total number of cases has risen by 122, or about 10 percent. Since March, the World Health Organization has reported more than 1,300 cases and 728 deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Nigeria has reported one case in a traveler from Liberia.
In response, the CDC is sending at least 50 more doctors and scientists to the region to help get the outbreak under control and stop its spread, Frieden says. The agency already has 12 people on the ground there now.
The CDC also elevated the travel alert to “Level 3” — the most serious level — for Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone. It now advises against any nonessential travel to the three countries because of the “high risk.”
This advisory level is reserved for grave situations, such as the SARS outbreak in 2003 and the Haiti earthquake in 2010.
The measure reduces the risk of Americans catching Ebola, Frieden says. And it also helps to prevent overcrowding of clinics and hospitals with emergencies not related to Ebola.
Continue reading.
Photo: Red Cross volunteers prepare to bury the body of an Ebola victim in Pendembu, Sierra Leone, early this month. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)


Why does Ebola have to happen as I start work, I’m gonna diagnose everryone with it. Just in case…

nprglobalhealth:

As Ebola Surges, CDC Sends Aid And Warns Against Travel

For the second time this week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has raised the travel alert for three West African countries, as the death toll in the Ebola outbreak increased at an alarming rate.

"The bottom line is that the multiple outbreaks in West Africa are worsening right now," the CDC’s director Dr. Tom Frieden told NPR Thursday. “This is the biggest, most complex and the most difficult outbreak of Ebola that we’ve had to deal with.”

In only four days, the total number of cases has risen by 122, or about 10 percent. Since March, the World Health Organization has reported more than 1,300 cases and 728 deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Nigeria has reported one case in a traveler from Liberia.

In response, the CDC is sending at least 50 more doctors and scientists to the region to help get the outbreak under control and stop its spread, Frieden says. The agency already has 12 people on the ground there now.

The CDC also elevated the travel alert to “Level 3” — the most serious level — for Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone. It now advises against any nonessential travel to the three countries because of the “high risk.”

This advisory level is reserved for grave situations, such as the SARS outbreak in 2003 and the Haiti earthquake in 2010.

The measure reduces the risk of Americans catching Ebola, Frieden says. And it also helps to prevent overcrowding of clinics and hospitals with emergencies not related to Ebola.

Continue reading.

Photo: Red Cross volunteers prepare to bury the body of an Ebola victim in Pendembu, Sierra Leone, early this month. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)

Why does Ebola have to happen as I start work, I’m gonna diagnose everryone with it. Just in case…

dxmedstudent

dxmedstudent:

The Student Room have an excellent table of the current (as of August 2013*).  As per usual always check with the universities you are interested in. Always. You only get to apply to 4 medical schools in a UCAS cycle.  Don’t be the person who wasted a precious place on their application because they didn’t bother to check whether that university accepts students with their choice of A levels.

Super useful for all you UK hopefuls…

dxmedstudent

Anonymous asked:

Hey do you know any medicine tumblers who are English? How different is the American medicine procedure of like the process of getting in

ladykaymd answered:

wayfaringmd still has the most comprehensive list of medblrs! Some of the people on there are UK docs/med students. :) 

I know next to nothing about the process of admission in the UK so I would pleasantly ask any of my followers who are premed/med in the UK to reblog this with the answer of what the UK admissions are like! :) 

Thanks lovely friends across the pond! :)

dxmedstudent:

Hi, anon! I wrote a post about this only recently, listing all the UK medblrs I currently know, with the aim of finding new UK Medblrs.Some of them aren’t on Wayfaring’s list yet.  Feel free to check them out, many of them are willing to answer questions from prospective students. 

I have also written several posts about the UK medical school admission process from my experiece, because it’s quite different to the US one. The entrance exams used, and the application processes themselves have similarities, but you will probably find it much more useful to google UK-specific resources. There are a lot of resources out there, luckily. Bear in mind that what each university expects can be slightly different (for example, the weighting they give entrance exams versus personal statements, or the A level subjects they want you to have taken), so if in doubt, talk to the universities you are considering applying to.

I link to some pretty interesting articles and resources about admissions, and I’m sure you will be able to find many more.  If you’re in the dark it might provide a starting point for your journey. Good luck!

Anonymous asked:

What's your view on smoking whilst breastfeeding and drinking about three hours before a feed ?

Never really looked at alcohol and breast feeding so good question. The website below offers some reliable advice, they recommend if you are to drink whilst breast feeding, have a drink with a meal AFTER you feed, then the alcohol has time to be processed before the next feed. But remember drink in moderation, try and have alcohol free days at least twice a week.

https://www.drinkaware.co.uk/check-the-facts/health-effects-of-alcohol/fertility-and-pregnancy/alcohol-and-breastfeeding

As for smoking…to put it bluntly my view is don’t smoke. Your child will want a healthy parent as they grow up who is going to be around for as long as possible. Smoking is a sure fire way to end up dying prematurely, not something you want to put your child through. And smoking in the house or around the baby is detrimental to your child’s health. Try and cut down first, then attempt to quit with some support…speak to your doctor/nurse.